Seawind 1000XL

By: Allan Whiting, Photography by: Allan Whiting


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The latest incarnation of the ubiquitous Seawind 1000 is the extended-hull XL. Could this be the quintessential cruising cat?

Seawind 1000XL
Seawind 1000XL
  • The Seawind 1000XL follows the 1000 – Australia’s most successful catamaran model and a significant export business winner.
  • The principal changes between the 1000 and XL are at the aft end of the hulls, where an 850mm extension has been built into each hull moulding. The extra length reportedly adds a knot to boat speed.
  • The boat’s constructed from vinylester resin/foam laminate, with moulded non-slip deck surfaces. Beneath the gelcoat is a vinylester tie layer that is osmosis resistant; then come the outer and inner laminates, made from chopped strand and woven polyester, sandwiching polyurethane foam.
  • The new headsail design is self-tacking, with 2:1 sheet purchase, via a clew block. A jib sheet car runs on a deck track that has manually adjustable stops, for upwind and downwind sheet angle adjustment.
  • An integrated cockpit/saloon design creates a single space that’s normally available only in much larger boats.

Changes introduced when the XL version was released include forward opening coach house windows, a self-tacking jib, 2:1 main halyard purchase, single-line mainsail reefing and a boom cradle on the cabin roof.

Hulls are connected by five, through-bolted aluminium beams, including one located under the mast step, and by an FRP deck and hardtop structure. The deck structure is stiffened by moulded seats and companionways.

Tempo Spars built the rigid mast assembly and it comprises an aluminium section with double, swept-back and forward-projecting tri-star spreaders, stiffened by upper and lower diamond stays of 8mm 1x19 wire. The mast foot sits on a hinge pin, allowing forward lowering.

Masthead shrouds and a 7/8ths forestay of 10mm 1x19 wire hold the stick upright. The shrouds mount to external chainplates on the hulls and the forestay attaches to a forward beam fitting.

The boom mounts an outhaul, two one-line-system reefing lines and a large sail bag with lazy jacks. The fully-battened mainsail zips into the bag and is hoisted by a double-purchase headboard block. Batten tension can be adjusted at the luff.

The halyards are Spectra rope, led through mast-base turning blocks to Spinlock jammers. All sail control lines lead to the cockpit.

The new headsail design is self-tacking, with 2:1 sheet purchase, via a clew block. A jib sheet car runs on a deck track that has manually adjustable stops, for upwind and downwind sheet angle adjustment.

The 1000XL’s mainsheet system is end-boom design, with 8:1 purchase blocks and a car that travels almost the full width of the aft structural beam. The sheet is well clear of the cockpit floor area, but car travel can conflict with targa-seat passengers’ legs.

There are two Harken ST40 winches – plenty for halyard/sheet duties, considering the main is a block system, the jib is self-tacking and there is an ample supply of rope clutches. With the halyards set, the winches are free for flying headsail or spinnaker sheeting.

There is an optional ‘apex’ triangular bowsprit that can mount a furling screecher, lightweight headsail. However, the sail isn’t UV resistant like the furling jib, so it needs to be stowed below after use. The alternative downwind sail is an asymmetric spinnaker, tacked between blocks on both bows with a snuffer.

An integrated cockpit/saloon design creates a single space that’s normally available only in much larger boats.

The air space between the aft edge of hardtop and the targa frame can be roofed with zip-off canvas. If the weather turns nasty, the saloon can be closed in by canvas and clears. The targa frame mounts two 120W solar panels and can incorporate davits for a tender.
The panels recharge a bank of three 120amp/h deep cycle batteries.

The saloon has seating space for eight — 10 if the boat has the optional soft-top icebox seat — and the dinette converts to a king-size bed. Below deck is sleeping for eight people.

The XL has a Yamaha 9.9hp High Thrust outboard in each hull, on mounts separated by more than five metres.

Hoisting sail is an easy operation for a crew of two and simple enough for one if the optional autopilot is employed.

The Seawind 1000XL had a pleasant motion in short chop, even when we deliberately headed it into the waves or ran square on.

Upwind in a fluctuating 15 to 20-knot nor’easter the boat speed varied from 6.5 to around eight knots.

During our three-hour play with the Seawind the boat moved easily, without hobby-horsing and people walked around without having to lurch for handholds.

The Seawind 1000XL is excellent value for money, offering proven world cruising ability in a package that’s less than half the price of some imports.

For in-dept boat reviews, see the latest issue of Trade A Boat magazine, on sale now at all good retailers.

Specifications Seawind 1000XL

(price as reviewed A$351,000, priced from A$325,490 sail-away)

LOA 10.85m
Beam 5.9m
Draft 1.0m
Construction FRP foam sandwich
Weight 5500kg
Berths Four cabins, plus dinette bed
Fuel 100lt
Water 400lt
Holding tank 90lt
Engines 2 x 9.9hp Yamaha High Thrust

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